Monday, February 01, 2016

New Year's Resolution

Ok, so I really don't ever do these.  Resolutions never finish well. Let's be honest who has ever actually completed a New Year's Resolution.  Nevertheless, I'm starting one.  It is to update this blog more.   I would like to say that I'm going to update this once a week, or even once a month, but I don't know.  All I know is that I want to try to be better about updating.  I'm not even sure if people are reading this, but I think in the future, I'll be glad I did.
I'm not a writer, I don't sit and write in journals, but I want to continue to document our time in Zambia.  After almost ten years, what else is there to say? I feel like most of these posts are just mundane things that have been said over and over and over.  I'm sorry if all these posts sound the same.  I am going to try and find more interesting things, I know we have had some crazy experiences, and I want to share those.
We have a wonderful life in Kaputa, our friends are wonderful, ministry is wonderful (though hard work sometimes),  Kaputa is a great place to raise a family.  We truly love it.
So as we are finished with the first month of this year already, I am going to be intentional about looking for things to write about! We have spent the last month in the USA having a small but insanely busy vacation.  Our journey home to Kaputa starts tomorrow.  I'm sure with the rains, and the roads, there should be some interesting stories of our trip home.
Thank you for reading, and for following along with our journey all these years!


4 comments:

Emily Ferris said...

I read!! :) Always love an update on your sweet family! Praying for y'all as you transition back!

Jason Fort said...

My name is Jason, and I have a blogger account on here, and post blogs as well. I wanted to let you know that I read c couple of your posts, and you are not alone in wondering how many people actually take the time to really READ what you post. I mean sure, there are those stats you can check to see how often your blog has been viewed, but you only get true evidence that someone actually read the post when you see someone else's words about your particular post...such as a comment here on the blog, or a heading on a Facebook or Twitter Share. I thought I would take a moment to encourage you - especially to see that you are in the ministry, so far from home. Thank you for what you do; feel free to read anything by Jason E. Fort anytime :)
God Bless
Jason

Jason Fort said...

My name is Jason, and I have a blogger account on here, and post blogs as well. I wanted to let you know that I read a couple of your posts, and you are not alone in wondering how many people actually take the time to really READ what you post. I mean sure, there are those stats you can check to see how often your blog has been viewed, but you only get true evidence that someone actually read the post when you see someone else's words about your particular post...such as a comment here on the blog, or a heading on a Facebook or Twitter Share. I thought I would take a moment to encourage you - especially to see that you are in the ministry, so far from home. Thank you for what you do; feel free to read anything by Jason E. Fort anytime :)
God Bless
Jason

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